Monthly Archives: June 2016

Research techniques marketing

1. Companies carry out Market Research to gather and analyse data to understand and explain what people think about products or adverts, to find out about customer satisfaction and to predict how customers might respond to a new product on the market.

2.Market Research can be categorised under two subheadings – Quantitative Research and Qualitative Research. The questions asked with Quantitative Research are structured whereas Qualitative Research questions are much more open and can often reveal consumption habits which the researchers hadn’t previously considered. You carry out Quantitative Research when you need to know how many people have certain habits and the Qualitative Research when you need to know why and how people do what they do.

3.Companies involved in Market Research include the Research Buyer and the Research Agency. The research agency carries out the market research in ways previously discussed with their clients – the research buyer. Sometimes companies only need their own data analysed, or are simply looking for advice on how to carry out their own research. Points that are discussed between the two parties can include:

  • The time duration of the research
  • The budget available
  • Who the target groups are
  • Predictions of results
  • How the results will be helpful

4

  • Street Surveys – stopping people in the street
  • Phone or postal – people fill in questionnaires and send them back
  • Internet surveys – a relatively new technique which functions in a similar way to other surveys except that a large number of people are interviewed at the same time

5

  • Am I asking the right groups of people?
  • How many people should I speak to in order to get representative answers to my questions?
  • Are my questions easy to understand?
  • How am I going to analyse the data?

Why is this important

Achievement is what you have done of significance at work which has benefited your company or organisation. Think about your work achievements. Or even your life achievements – these are the successes that you have had so far. Perhaps you have just passed your driving test, or maybe after many years of trying, you have learnt to swim. This is an achievement as it is something you have worked hard for, and in the end the results have been successful.

Why is this important?

In our lives it is important to have objectives so when you have reached them you can say you have some achievements. Think about when you were younger, and your ambitions. Maybe you wanted to become a doctor, so you studied hard, and you finally became a doctor. Perhaps you wanted to have a house with a big garden. Can you remember the day you fulfilled this dream? These are personal achievements and they give you the feeling of self-satisfaction, confidence, and happiness. Let us now take a look at your work achievements. When you have achievement at work it means that you are working towards goals normally set by others, but they can be set by yourself, too. Perhaps you have to reach a sales target, or you need to complete a project within a deadline, or perhaps you need to see clients or customers and help them in some way. If you succeed in helping them, or you reach your sales target, or you complete your project by the deadline, you have examples of achievements. Striving for achievements shows determination and tenacity.

 

How can you show you have this competency?

If you have a job interview and you want to demonstrate your achievements you need to think about different situations you have been in, the actions you have taken, and the results of these actions. Perhaps you have had a difficult customer, how have you dealt with that person? Did your action benefit your organisation? In what way? If your results were successful, state this either in your job application, or in your interview.
Think about the skills which you have which make you attractive and valuable as an employee. Remember the more achievement you can give as examples, the more you can sell and market yourself for the job.

 

How to improve this skill

If there is a goal which seems difficult to achieve, don’t give up easily. If you can understand your goal and work towards it this will show that you have the potential to achieve. You need to be able to face obstacles and be determined enough to meet targets. Think about a time where you have had to take “no” for an answer, did you just accept it? Don’t just accept it, find out why the answer is “no”.
Also ask for feedback as this can give you an indication of how you are doing. You could compare this to learning a language, for example, if you find some grammar difficult you can always ask your teacher for feedback on your exercises. You can apply this rule to the workplace as well and if you are not sure of how you are progressing, ask!

Success on management business

When you first read the text, don’t worry about the numbers in brackets.  You will fill in the gaps in Exercise 1.

A change for the better?

In the world of business, change is inevitable.  Nobody would seriously argue with that, especially at a time when IT developments are sweeping through all areas of work and changing how things are done and who does them.  But when change does come, not everybody agrees on what it means.  How you view change depends on in the organisation, and managers and employees usually have very different perspectives.

If you’re , your focus is on results, and you’ll see the change as the best way to realise them.  They are more aware of the business’ overall goals, the financial state of the company and its position with regard to competitors and market share.

When  consider introducing change, they ask questions such as, ‘How quickly can it be implemented?’, ‘How will it benefit the company?’, ‘What investment is required?’, ‘How cost effective is the change?’ and ‘How will it affect our customers?’  Since they are usually the advocates of change, managers tend to be more enthusiastic about it.

If you’re , however, your focus is more on the immediate task of getting the job done.  They seldom have time to consider how their work fits into the overall scheme of things; they don’t share the broader perspective of the company directors.  Because they are often skilled and experienced in their work, or because they are placed on the frontline dealing with customers on a daily basis, they look at change from a personal perspective.

The questions  ask are, ‘How will this effect the quality of my work?’, ‘How much time will it take for me to adapt?’, ‘What’s wrong with the way we’ve always done things?’ and, ultimately, ‘What’s in it for me?’  Since employees are the ones who have to put the change into action, they are usually less enthusiastic about it.

With such different  about change within the organisation, it’s not surprising that innovation often fails.  Planned changes need to be carefully thought out and managed.  If not, morale will suffer as people feel that they are being forced to change against their will.   There will surely be resistance, and some highly valued members of staff may even decide it’s time to leave.

All of this can eventually have a negative affect on productivity and efficiency.  Management will have to admit defeat and drop the change, or risk losing  to the competition…and then another great idea bites the dust.

Fine Shirtmakers

Set up in the 1920s by James Carston, a Manchester tailor, the company has remained in the family and is now run by James’s grandson, Paul Carston.  Employing fewer than 50 people, the company has a reputation for producing high-quality men’s shirts, which it sells by mail order, and has a loyal customer base.  As Paul Carston says, ‘Once someone has tried our shirts, they tend to come back for more.  Our customers appreciate the attention to detail and the high-quality fabric we use.’  And it’s the fabric they now use that makes the company almost unique in the world of men’s shirt manufacturers.

When Paul Carston took over running the company in 1999, he inherited a business that prided itself on using local well-paid machinists rather than sweatshop labour, and looked upon its employees as members of an extended family.  Paul, a committed environmentalist, felt that the company fitted in well with his values.  The shirts were made from 100 per cent cotton, and as Paul says, ‘It’s a completely natural fibre, so you would think it was environmentally sound’.  Then Paul read a magazine article about Fair Trade and cotton producers.  He was devastated to read that the cotton industry is a major source of pollution, and that the synthetic fertilisers used to produce cotton are finding their way into the food chain.

Paul takes up the story.  ‘I investigated our suppliers, and sure enough found that they were producing cotton on an industrial scale using massive amounts of chemicals.  Then I looked into organic cotton suppliers, and found an organisation of Indian farmers who worked together to produce organic cotton on a Fair Trade basis.  Organic cotton is considerably more expensive than conventionally produced cotton, so I did the sums. I discovered that if we were prepared to take a cut in profits, we would only need to add a couple of pounds to the price of each shirt to cover the extra costs.  The big risk, of course, was whether our customers would pay extra for organic cotton.’

Paul did some research into the ethical clothing market and discovered that although there were several companies producing casual clothing such as T-shirts in organic cotton, there was a gap in the market for smart men’s shirts.  He decided to take the plunge and switch entirely to organic cotton.  He wrote to all his customers explaining the reasons for the change, and at the same time the company set up a website so they could sell the shirts on the internet.  The response was encouraging.  Although they lost some of their regular customers, they gained a whole customer base looking for formal shirts made from organic cotton, and the company is going from strength to strength.